Civil servants ban, hike in party registration worries Ethiopia opposition

Civil servants ban, hike in party registration worries Ethiopia opposition

ETHIOPIA

The number of signatures required to form a party in Ethiopia under the new political party / electoral law is raising eyebrows. A ban on civil servants participating in active politics is another sticking point.

One of the main amendments raised the number of signatures required to register a national political party to 10,000, up from 1,500. Regional parties will need 4,000 signatures, up from 750.

“It is very essential to create an environment where political parties can merge and form a front,” the bill read.

Late last week, 57 opposition parties said their proposed amendments to the bill were ignored by the ruling party, who currently hold all parliamentary seats.

“We had suggestions which were not included in the final bill, for example we are strongly opposed to the provision that civil servants must vacate their jobs if they are going to run for office,” Desalegn Chane, head of the opposition National Movement of Amhara (NAMA), told Sky News Africa.

“This is unfair. Government employees should be allowed to run.”

Merera Gudina, a former political prisoner and the chairman of the Oromo Federalist Congress, said his party’s request to lower the number of signatures was ignored.

“We made a lot of noise against the final draft and were strongly against some of the provisions that were put in at the last minute. It was the invisible hands of the EPRDF,” he told Sky News Africa.

Geressu Gessa, speaking on behalf of a group of opposition parties, told reporters on Friday: “The government should stop its approach of non-inclusiveness and…call a discussion with us.”

The country has regularly held elections since the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) took power in 1991 but, with the exception of the 2005 election, none have been competitive.

Abiy was appointed by the EPRDF in April 2018 after three years of anti-government protests, promising a series of political reforms, including a credible multi-party election in 2020.

The changes to the law approved by parliament will disadvantage opposition parties seeking to challenge the EPRDF’s grip, two senior opposition politicians told Sky News Africa after the bill was approved.

Abiy has rolled out a series of political reforms since coming to power last year, including lifting bans on several parties, releasing political prisoners and journalists, and welcoming home exiled rebel groups.

But an attempted coup in June by a rogue militia in the northern Amhara region and rising ethnic violence across the country has raised doubts over the EPRDF’s ability to ensure security and whether the election will be held.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here